Home > ForgeRock, Identity Management, OpenIDM > Configuring OpenIDM on a Read Only File System in 10 Easy Steps

Configuring OpenIDM on a Read Only File System in 10 Easy Steps

 

During the normal course of events, OpenIDM writes or updates various files on the file system to which it is installed.  This includes log files, audit files, process IDs, configuration files, or even cached information.  There are times, however when you find yourself needing to deploy OpenIDM to a read only file system – one to which you cannot write typical data.

Read Only File SystemFortunately, OpenIDM is flexible enough to allow such an installation, you just need to make some adjustments to various settings to accommodate this.

The following information provides details on how to configure OpenIDM on a read only file system.  It includes the types of information that OpenIDM writes by default, where it writes the information, and how you can alter the default behavior – and it does it in just 10 EASY Steps (and not all of them are even required!).
 

Note:  The following steps assume that you have a shared (mounted) folder at /idm, that you are using OpenIDM 4.0, it is running as the frock user, and that the frock user has write access to the /idm folder.

 
1. Create external folder structure for logging, auditing, and internal repository information.

$ sudo mkdir -p /idm/log/openidm/audit
$ sudo mkdir /idm/log/openidm/logs
$ sudo mkdir -p /idm/cache/openidm/felix-cache
$ sudo mkdir /idm/run/openidm

2. Change ownership of the external folders to the “idm” user.

$ sudo chown -R frock:frock /idm/log/openidm
$ sudo chown -R frock:frock /idm/cache/openidm
$ sudo chown -R frock:frock /idm/run/openidm

 

Note: OpenIDM writes its audit data (recon, activity, access, etc.) to two locations by default: the filesystem and the repo. This is configured in the conf/audit.json file.

 

3. Open the conf/audit.json file and verify that OpenIDM is writing its audit data to the repo as follows (note: this is the default setting):

"handlerForQueries" : "repo",

4. Open the conf/audit.json file and redirect the audit data to the external folder as follows:

"config" : {
"logDirectory" : "/idm/log/openidm/audit"
},

After making these changes, this section of the audit.json will appear as follows (see items in bold font):

{
"auditServiceConfig" : {
"handlerForQueries" : "repo",
"availableAuditEventHandlers" : [
"org.forgerock.audit.events.handlers.csv.CsvAuditEventHandler",
"org.forgerock.openidm.audit.impl.RepositoryAuditEventHandler",
"org.forgerock.openidm.audit.impl.RouterAuditEventHandler"
]
},
"eventHandlers" : [
{
"name" : "csv",
"class" : "org.forgerock.audit.events.handlers.csv.CsvAuditEventHandler",
"config" : {
"logDirectory" : "/idm/log/openidm/audit"
},
"topics" : [ "access", "activity", "recon", "sync", "authentication", "config" ]
},

As an alternate option you can disable the writing of audit data altogether by setting the enabled flag to false for the appropriate event handler(s). The following snippet from the audit.json demonstrates how to disable file-based auditing.

"eventHandlers" : [
{
"name" : "csv",
"enabled" : false,
"class" : "org.forgerock.audit.events.handlers.csv.CsvAuditEventHandler",
"config" : {
"logDirectory" : "/audit",
},
"topics" : [ "access", "activity", "recon", "sync", "authentication", "config" ]

 

Note: OpenIDM writes its logging data to the local filesystem by default. This is configured in the conf/logging.properties file.

 

5. Open the conf/logging.properties file and redirect OpenIDM logging data to the external folder as follows:

java.util.logging.FileHandler.pattern = /idm/log/openidm/logs/openidm%u.log

 

Note: OpenIDM caches its Felix files in the felix-cache folder beneath the local installation. This is configured in the conf/config.properties file.

 

6. Open the conf/config.properties file and perform the following steps:

 
a. Redirect OpenIDM Felix Cache to the external folder as follows:
 

# If this value is not absolute, then the felix.cache.rootdir controls
# how the absolute location is calculated. (See buildNext property)
org.osgi.framework.storage=${felix.cache.rootdir}/felix-cache

 
b. Define the relative path to the Felix Cache as follows:
 

# The following property is used to convert a relative bundle cache
# location into an absolute one by specifying the root to prepend to
# the relative cache path. The default for this property is the
# current working directory.
felix.cache.rootdir=/idm/cache/openidm

 
After making these changes, this section of the config.properties will appear as follows (see items in bold font):
 

# If this value is not absolute, then the felix.cache.rootdir controls
# how the absolute location is calculated. (See buildNext property)
org.osgi.framework.storage=${felix.cache.rootdir}/felix-cache

# The following property is used to convert a relative bundle cache
# location into an absolute one by specifying the root to prepend to
# the relative cache path. The default for this property is the
# current working directory.
felix.cache.rootdir=/idm/cache/openidm

 

Note: During initial startup, OpenIDM generates a self-signed certificate and stores its security information in the keystore and truststore files as appropriate. This is not possible in a read-only file system, however. As such, you should generate a certificate ahead of time and make it part of your own deployment.

 

7. Update keystore and truststore files with certificate information and an updated password file as appropriate. The process you choose to follow will depend on whether you use a self-signed certificate or obtain one from a certificate authority.

 

Note: On Linux systems, OpenIDM creates a process ID file (PID file) on startup and removes the file during shutdown. The location of the PID File is defined in both the start script (startup.sh) and the shutdown script (shutdown.sh). The default location of the process ID is $OPENIDM_HOME folder.

 

8. Open the startup.sh script and update the location of the process ID file by adding the following line immediately after the comments section of the file:

OPENIDM_PID_FILE="/idm/run/openidm/.openidm.pid"

9. Repeat Step 7 with the shutdown.sh script.

 

Note: OpenIDM reads configuration file changes from the file system by default. If your environment allows you to update these files during the deployment process of a new release, then no additional changes are necessary. However, if you truly have a read only file system (i.e. no changes even to configuration files) then you can disable the monitoring of these configuration files in the next step. Keep in mind, however, that this requires that all configuration changes must then be performed over REST.

 

10. Open the conf/system.properties file and disable monitoring of JSON and subsequent loading of configuration file changes by uncommenting the following line:

#openidm.fileinstall.enabled=false

 
 

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